Kumquats are a citrus fruit available in the winter months. They look like an orange, only they are much smaller and they are oval-shaped. Like other citrus fruits, they are quite high in vitamin C. Kumquats are pretty sour, but their edible peel is sweet.

kumquats550

Kumquats are not easy to find where I live; when I found them, I made the purchase without question (I imagine they are easier to come by in warmer climes).

I had no idea what I would do with my little beauties until I saw the recipe for Kumquat Champagne Confit in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day by Jeff Herzberg and Zoe Francois.

It was perfect timing, really, since I had a whole lot of champagne left over from New Year’s Eve. I used the remainder of an open bottle (about 3 1/2 cups) in this marmalade. While the Artisan Bread recipe is fairly simple, I complicated mine a bit (in a good way, I think), by using honey instead of sugar, as well as lots of sweet dried fruits and herbs/spices.

I’m calling it a marmalade not because I like marmalade (I generally don’t), but because it’s a sweetened preparation of citrus that includes the peel. Whether you usually like marmalade or not, I urge you to give this one a try.

This recipe makes just over a pint. I love it spread onto organic uncured ham slices, which I roll up and eat as a quick lunch with a salad. It’s also delicious spooned over plain Greek yogurt (and ice cream too, I imagine), as well as with goat cheese and rice crackers…

marmoncracker

…and since the recipe inspiration came from a bread book, I am sure it’s great on bread, too.

If you don’t have any leftover champagne that you are willing to use, I see no reason why this wouldn’t work with sparkling apple cider (or another type of juice); it will be quite a bit sweeter, though, so you may want to reduce the amount of dried fruits. You could also use water for part of the liquid…

Kumquat Marmalade with Champagne and Figs

Ingredients:

3 1/2 cups champagne
1/2 cup honey
2 cinnamon sticks
4 cardamom pods
40 kumquats
20 dried figs, trimmed and roughly chopped
1/2 cup raisins
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 Tb. rose water- optional

Directions:

In a medium-sized pot on the stove, bring the champagne and honey to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and add the cinnamon sticks and the cardamom pods.

Roughly chop the kumquats and remove as many seeds as possible. You’ll be able to remove more later, but if a few remain, they won’t harm you. Add to the champagne and honey. Add the dried fruits and allow to simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the kumquats and dried fruits are very tender and the mixture is fairly thick. Remove and discard any visible remaining kumquat seeds, as well as the cinnamon sticks.

Turn off the heat and allow the marmalade to cool. Process in a high speed blender or food processor to break up any large chucks of fruit and to pulverize the cardamon. Return to the pot and add the vanilla and optional rose water. Mix well, and then spoon into glass jar(s). Store in the refrigerator; it will keep for a week or two.

smallmarm

More Yummy Kumquat Recipes:
Candied Kumquats with Vanilla and Cinnamon from Caviar and Codfish
Camembert and Kumquat Chutney Toasts from Food Blogga
Kumquat Salsa from Simply Recipes

whblogoThis kumquat marmalade recipe is my contribution to Weekend Herb Blogging.

WHB was founded by Kalyn of Kalyn’s Kitchen and it is currently managed by Haalo of Cook Almost Anything. Haalo is the host this week, as well!

 

12 Comments

  1. 1

    Kristin Rimkus — January 8, 2010 @ 7:51 am

    I’ve not used kumquat’s before either. I love marmalade. I’ve saved your recipe to give it a try. Looks delicious!

  2. 2

    Kalynskitchen — January 8, 2010 @ 8:47 am

    So interesting. I’ve never eaten kumquats, but I do look at them at the store and wonder what they’re like!

  3. 3

    MaryMoh — January 8, 2010 @ 9:10 am

    Looks beautiful. I love kumquats. It’s such a lovely fruit. I like to make kumquat candies….delicious!

  4. 4

    drwinnie — January 9, 2010 @ 6:10 am

    Kristen- I really don’t like typical marmalade but I love this, so do try it!

    Kalyn- Kumquats are pretty unusual…they don’t really taste like anything else. Give them a go sometime!

    MaryMoh- Kumquat candies sound so intriguing! YUM.

  5. 5

    Kitchen Butterfly — January 9, 2010 @ 4:13 pm

    Winnie, this is right up my alley. I am a kumquat freak. My blog post tomorrow shows them poached in red wine….along with some pears!

    Now on to the subject of Zoe and Jeff, my current post on wholemeal pitas is made from one of their recipes – aren’t they great!

    Best wishes for 2010 and on food 52.

  6. 6

    drwinnie — January 9, 2010 @ 4:49 pm

    Thanks KB!

  7. 7

    tigerfish — January 11, 2010 @ 6:41 pm

    Kumquats remind me of the Chinese New Year :O

  8. 8

    Joanne — January 13, 2010 @ 8:58 pm

    Can you believe that I’ve never had kumquats? How sad. I need to change that and perhaps I shall do so with this recipe! Sounds delicious.

  9. 9

    On Flavoured Oils: Kumquat Oil | Kitchen Butterfly — June 29, 2010 @ 2:08 pm

    [...] Kumquat marmalade with Champagne and figs from Winne Abbie’s Healthy Green Kitchen [...]

  10. 10

    Champagne Extract 2 1oz Bottles — September 15, 2010 @ 2:55 am

    [...] Kumquat Marmalade with Champagne and Figs | Healthy Green Kitchen It was perfect timing, really, since I had a whole lot of champagne left over from New Year's Eve. I used the remainder of an open bottle (about 3 1/2 cups) in this marmalade. While the Artisan Bread recipe is fairly simple, I complicated mine a bit (in . Kumquat Marmalade with Champagne and Figs. Ingredients: 3 1/2 cups champagne 1/2 cup honey 2 cinnamon sticks 4 cardamom pods 40 kumquats 20 dried figs, trimmed and roughly chopped 1/2 cup raisins 1 tsp. vanilla extract [...]

  11. 11

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  12. 12

    Healthy Green Kitchen Spiced Candied Kumquats and a DIY Gift Round-up — July 30, 2013 @ 3:27 pm

    [...] I never tasted a kumquat before I was a blogger, though: I tried my first ones last year, when I turned them into this marmalade. [...]