Scones are easy to make and they’re so, so tasty. This blueberry scone recipe is a favorite around here; my daughter loves those so much, in fact, that she was pretty skeptical when I recently made this orange date oatmeal version instead. She didn’t even want to try them at first, but she came around eventually. She still prefers the blueberry ones, but admitted these are delicious, too :)

scone

These orange date oatmeal scones are not too sweet and they have some “heft” due to the oats. They are adapted from a recipe in the lovely book Irish Pantry: Traditional Breads, Preserves, and Goodies to Feed the Ones You Love (I was sent a review copy). I made a few changes to the recipe in the book, one of which was to halve the amount of butter. I have absolutely nothing against butter (I love it, in fact!) but two sticks seemed like a lot to me.

orange date scone recipe | healthy green kitchen
orange date scone recipe | healthy green kitchen

You can use a food processor to make these if you want to speed things up (and a food processor does make incorporating the butter into the dough a snap), but I made the recipe by hand and it worked out fine. I imagine you can substitute another type of dried fruit for the dates: the recipe in Irish Pantry features currants, but raisins or dried berries would work, too…you take your pick. Lemon zest and juice can certainly be used instead of the orange zest and juice, if you like, but I do like the orange date combo, I must say.

orange date scone recipe | healthy green kitchen

Recipe for Orange Date Oatmeal Scones

Yield: 8 scones

These are very filling and make a nice breakfast with a hard-boiled egg or two...and don't forget the tea! I stored my batch in a glass container and was pleasantly surprised to find that they kept for a whole week; they may also be frozen for longer term storage.

Ingredients:

*2 cups white whole wheat flour (or whole wheat pastry flour)
*1/2 cup coconut sugar, plus a little more to sprinkle to scones before baking (or turbinado or organic sugar)
*2 teaspoons baking powder
*1 teaspoon baking soda
*4 ounces (1 stick) cold, unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
*1 tablespoon freshly squeezed orange juice (I squeezed it from a Cara Cara orange)
*1 cup organic rolled oats
*zest of 1 orange (again, I used a Cara Cara orange)
*1 cup natural buttermilk, plus more if needed
*2/3 cup chopped dried dates (or currants or another dried fruit)

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use a silicone baking mat.

2. Combine the flour, 1/2 cup of sugar, baking powder, and baking soda in a bowl (or the bowl of a food processor). Add the butter and orange juice and, if working by hand, cut the butter into the flour mixture using 2 knives or a pastry cutter (if using a food processor, pulse 15-20 times or until it forms a rough crumb). Transfer the dough to a larger bowl and stir in the oats and zest. Then stir in the buttermilk and currants until just moistened; form the dough into a ball. (If the dough is too crumbly to stick together, stir in more buttermilk one teaspoon at a time...be careful not to overwork the dough, though.)

3. After bringing the dough together, gently pat it into an 8-inch round. Cut into 8 wedges and transfer to the prepared baking sheet with some room between each one. Sprinkle the tops with the additional coconut or other sugar.

4. Bake for about 15-18 minutes or until the bottoms are golden. Serve warm.

orange date scone recipe | healthy green kitchen

More of my scone recipes:

Pumpkin Scones
Peanut Butter and Jam Scones
Coconut Raisin Scones
Oatmeal Scones with Dried Cherries and Dark Chocolate

Yummy-looking scones from other bloggers:

Low-carb, Gluten-free Bacon, Sun-Dried Tomato, and Cheddar Scones from All Day I Dream About Food
Pear Chocolate Scones from Pastry Affair
Raspberry Cream Scones with Rosewater Glaze from Baking A Moment

 

7 Comments

  1. 1

    Kathryn — January 27, 2014 @ 8:30 am

    Love the sound of these and the textures/flavours here.

    On the butter note, I was comparing US v British scone recipes the other day (as one does…) and I was surprised to see a big difference in the butter content of the two. Even the amount of butter in these seems a lot to me when I usually make my scones with 2 cups of flour and 1/2 stick of butter. I noticed something similar when it comes to basic pastry recipes too. I’m yet to discover the reason but I thought it was fascinating to note!

    • Winnie replied: — January 27th, 2014 @ 11:18 am

      Interesting, because I would just assume the british ones would have more butter! I’ve made scones with lots of butter, little butter, no butter but cream or coconut cream, etc. etc and I love them them all…

  2. 2

    Gail {a healthy hunger} — January 27, 2014 @ 10:31 am

    I have seen high butter content scones too it makes for a more cookie crunchy texture. I sometimes switch out some or all if the butter with oil (adjusting for liquid elsewhere). It works pretty well.

    I love the color and texture of these. Gonna try these Winnie.

    • Winnie replied: — January 27th, 2014 @ 11:18 am

      These definitely do have a crunchy exterior but they are tender inside…I hope you do give them a try!

  3. 3

    Brian @ A Thought For Food — January 27, 2014 @ 10:06 pm

    Two sticks is definitely way too much butter… and I love butter. If these were cookies or a cake, I’d be like, “Heck, yeah, more butter.” But who wants to feel guilty first thing in the morning? Not me! But, yeah, these look totally rockin’! Love the textures!

  4. 4

    Laura (Tutti Dolci) — February 2, 2014 @ 12:38 am

    I love scones, these look wonderfully hearty for breakfast!

  5. 5

    Jennifer — June 14, 2014 @ 3:47 pm

    Love … We’ve a few times now, and soaked the cut dates 5 mins prior or not …added half a slice of orange on top of each wedge sprinkled with sugar, added more zest and orange … All combinations work beautifully, depending on your mood … Perfect with a hot cup of tea x