Quinoa Salad with Beets + Oranges

Maria Speck‘s award-winning first cookbook Ancient Grains for Modern Meals is one of my favorites, so I was extremely pleased when I heard Maria was writing a follow up. Her new book is called Simply Ancient Grains: Fresh and Flavorful Whole Grain Recipes for Living Well and I am happy to say this book is just as lovely as the first. It features beautiful, innovative ways to fit grains including amaranth, buckwheat, freekeh, millet, quinoa, sorghum, and teff into your life.

Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets and Oranges from @winnieab | www.healthygreenkitchen.com

Ancient grains are wholesome and versatile staple foods, and Maria will inspire you to think way outside the box with recipes such as Burgundy Bulger with Blueberries and Orange Blossom Water, Sweet Potato and Oat Cakes with Blue Cheese and Sage, and Lemony Millet Pudding with Caramelized Grapes. I made her gorgeous Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets for a family gathering and it quickly disappeared…I am certain you will have a similar experience with her recipes :)

Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets and Oranges from @winnieab | www.healthygreenkitchen.com

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Quinoa Salad with Black Beans + Corn

Quinoa Salad from Healthy Green Kitchen

Do you have a favorite summertime potluck dish? I do and you are looking at it!

Quinoa Salad from www.healthygreenkitchen.com

I’ve been making quinoa salad in one form or another for years. I like to play with the beans, veggies, and herbs I add based on what I have in the house/what’s in season. Black beans are definitely my preferred bean, and as soon as fresh local corn starts to make an appearance in markets around here, corn is pretty much a must. I’ve added basil on occasion but cilantro is definitely a better fit with the other elements in this particular salad.

Quinoa Salad with Black Beans and Corn

If you are as yet unfamiliar with quinoa, it’s a seed that’s native to the Andes region of South America. I ate it several times when I was recently in Peru, cooked in a stew. While it behaves like a grain, quinoa is actually more nutritious than most grains because it is high in protein, iron, and calcium. Quinoa is also gluten-free.

Quinoa seeds are coated with a bitter substance so you need to rinse quinoa very thorough before cooking. Moreover, quinoa benefits from a several hours-long soak in water in order to deactivate the naturally-present enzymes that bind up the nutrients within. For this reason, on days when I am planning to cook quinoa, I like to place it in a large bowl and cover it with water for 2-3 hours. Then I pour off the water, and rinse the quinoa in a fine mesh strainer before proceeding to cook it.

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Roasted Onions Stuffed with Curried Black Quinoa

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of The National Onion Association for Kitchen PLAY. I am being compensated for my efforts; all opinions are 100% mine. Storage onions have a low moisture content and thick skins, which makes them perfect for cooking techniques such as braising, caramelizing, and roasting (spring onions, … Read more

Black Quinoa and Red Lentil Salad with Parsley

I dreamed this salad up last week, thinking it would be perfect for Passover. Turns out there’s a lot of debate about whether or not quinoa’s actually Passover-appropriate (and many Jews won’t eat lentils during Passover, either). So while I am posting this during Passover, the observant among you might choose to make it some … Read more