I started this blog back in May of 2009. Since then, I’ve written almost 700 posts. And a book.

Since I have learned so much and changed so much in the past 5 years, it’s only natural that the look and feel of my blog evolves, as well. So I hired my talented friend Sabrina to give HGK a little makeover as a “blogiversary” gift to myself. I wanted the design to be very simple, natural, and a little messy, even (kind of like me!). I hope you like it as much as I do :)

(Please if you notice any problems with the new design, let me know! That way, we can fix whatever is wrong.)

And what’s a celebration without a decadent treat? I made a Chocolate Silk Pie to mark this blogging milestone.

Chocolate Silk Pie | Healthy Green Kitchen

My parents used to serve a similar French Silk Pie in their restaurant when I was a kid…I have such fond memories of that pie and have been wanting to make one like it for a long time. This pie is so easy to prepare and it’s absolutely delicious: I think it perfectly symbolizes where my blog and I are at these days and what you can expect to see here in the future.

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I missed out on sharing links for “Friday Shares” last week…sorry! Here are a few photos from my garden to make it up to you, plus an extra awesome list of links…I hope you have a nice, relaxing weekend that allows you time to check everything out.

bleeding heart | healthy green kitchen

irises | healthy green kitchen

lilacs | healthy green kitchen

Food/Nutrition-Related:

Nutrition Survival Guide (Nia Shanks)

Carb Controversy (Precision Nutrition)

Sensitive to Gluten? A Carb in Wheat May be the Real Culprit (NPR)

Other:

A Life Beyond Do What You Love (New York Times)

See The Unseen (5 Second Rule)

Anne Lamott on People Pleasing, Haters, and Trolls (Brain Pickings)

What’s the Harm? The Body Count of Pseudoscience (Skeptical Libertarian)

Recipes:

Potage St. Germain (Minted Pea Soup) (Bojon Gourmet)

Grilled Caesar Salad (The Year in Food)

Smashed Indian Baby Spiced Potato Medley (Food Wanderings)

Buttermilk Southwestern Chicken Wings (Nutmeg Nanny)

Lavender Creme Fraiche (Autumn Makes and Does)

Coconut Cake with Rose Petals (Wine Dine Daily)

The Bootleg Cocktail (Cookie and Kate)

Currently Reading:

Kombucha Revolution: 75 Recipes for Homemade Brews, Fixers, Elixirs, and Mixers

Fruitful: Four Seasons of Fresh Fruit Recipes

Fair Food: Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System for All

The Blue Zones, Second Edition: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest

Disclosure: Links to Amazon.com are affiliate links. When you make a purchase via one of my links, I make a small commission. Thank you!

This is a Sponsored post written by me on behalf of Organic Choice for SocialSpark. All opinions are 100% mine.

I was in my local farm/garden shop last week and a terracotta strawberry pot caught my eye. The shop also had beautiful strawberry plants meant for growing in containers so I bought a bunch, then came home and planted them right away.

plant strawberries in a container

Strawberries are perennials and while I've grown them in a raised bed in my garden before, I encountered some problems. The first year's harvest was great, but subsequent years were less so. (I am sure this is because I didn't manage the "runners" correctly). Also, my strawberry bed seems to always become filled with weeds that are difficult to deal with without pulling out the strawberries, too. So I thought I'd try something new this year.

plant strawberries in a container

Planting strawberries in containers is really easy. It's a great option if you don't want to deal with the work and potential problems that may occur when you plant a strawberry "patch"; it also makes a lot of sense if you want to grow some of your own food but you don't have a lot of space. Look for strawberry planters made from terracotta or plastic at garden shops or online and buy strawberries that are meant to be planted in containers (look for a variety that is drought-tolerant, disease-resistant, and which is a light runner producer). Then you can keep your strawberry pot in just about any sunny spot…mine is on a table on my deck. 

Strawberries have shallow root systems and you don't want the potting soil to dry out too much, but you definitely don't want to overwater them either (this can lead to rotting). Keep an eye on your strawberry pot especially once it starts to get hot: the strawberries will need more water during the phases that they are producing fruit. Strawberries benefit from mulching to conserve moisture and I will be adding mulch to my strawberry planter for sure.

The variety of strawberries that I planted are called Tristar. These are what is known as "everbearing" strawberries: they produce fruit sporadically from spring through the fall. (By contrast, June bearing varieties only produce berries in June). I planted one plant per hole and 4 plants at the very top. I used Organic Choice potting soil. 

plant strawberries in a container

As I mentioned above, strawberries are perennials. That said, I don't think strawberries in a container will make it through the winter where I live…I imagine I'll probably have to plant strawberries again next spring. But that's ok: I think I only spent about $12 on the plants in this container. 

In the past, I've heard you must pinch off the runners in order to increase the productivity of the plants, but Tristar strawberries aren't supposed to produce many runners: a good thing for container strawberries. I've also always heard you should be removing  the strawberry blossoms the first year you plant them to make the plants more vigorous but my research tells me this isn't really necessary for container strawberries, especially if I am probably going to be planting new ones next year.

I am very excited about my strawberries and will be sure to let you know how they taste and what I do with them!

Learn more about gardening and landscaping from Miracle-Gro Learn And Grow.

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