I recently read the Greece issue of Saveur Magazine from cover to cover. The stories, the photos, and the recipes were so compelling that my immediate reaction upon finishing was to run to the computer to find out how much it was going to cost me to get to Greece.

Sadly, I can’t afford that trip at any point in the near future. So for now, I have to content myself with making some of the recipes in the magazine, and I started with this fabulous Greek salad (aka Horiatiki).

Greek Salad 2

In my humble opinion, it’s the perfect Greek salad. It’s free of lettuce but heavy on the tomatoes, cucumbers, and feta. It contains just the right amount of fresh parsley and a nice dusting of dried oregano. The only change I made to the recipe was to use heirloom tomatoes and add a handful of purslane leaves, both of which I grow here.

purslane

Mind you, I am not growing purslane on purpose: it’s just all over my property. Purslane is considered a weed and like many weeds that are edible, it happens to be super nutritious. It contains more omega-3 fatty acids than any other vegetable, and it also contains significant amounts of numerous antioxidants.

greek salad 1

While both the stem and the leaves are edible, I prefer to stick with the leaves: they are quite tender and delicious.

Recipe for Greek Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes and Purslane

adapted from this recipe from Saveur Magazine
Serves 2

Ingredients:

*1-2 handfuls of fresh, clean purslane leaves
*2 medium heirloom tomatoes, cut into 1 1⁄2" pieces (I used 1 red and 1 yellow tomato)
*1 small cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise, and sliced into 1⁄4" pieces (I didn't peel mine, because it was organic and homegrown)
*1⁄2 medium white onion, thinly sliced (I used red onion)
*2 tablespoons roughly chopped fresh parsley, plus more for garnish
*3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
*1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
*1 pinch dried oregano, plus more for garnish
*Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
*3-6 oz. sliced feta cheese (I prefer sheep's milk feta, and I used the lesser amount)
*8 kalamata olives

Directions:

1. Combine purslane, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, and parsley in a medium bowl. In a smaller bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, and oregano; season with salt and pepper, pour over salad, and mix well. Transfer salad to a serving bowl or individual plates and top with sliced feta, olives, and another pinch of oregano; season with fresh ground pepper and more parsley, if desired.

Greek Salad 3

 

19 Comments

  1. 1

    Tweets that mention Greek Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes and Purslane | Healthy Green Kitchen -- Topsy.com — August 19, 2010 @ 7:32 pm

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by mary velasquez, Winnie Abramson. Winnie Abramson said: Fantastic Greek Salad from @SAVEURMAG (I added heirloom tomatoes and purslane)…http://su.pr/AOhuHA [...]

  2. 2

    Cook with Madin — August 19, 2010 @ 7:40 pm

    This is a lovely looking salad. I never used purslane before. Thank you for the info about it.
    Cute post, made me laughed about you checking how much it will cost you to go to Greece. Great photos too.

  3. 3

    drwinnie — August 19, 2010 @ 7:44 pm

    I really really want to go! But the airfare’s too much for a family of 4…I could try to sneak off and go on my own but don’t think that would go over too well ;)

  4. 4

    Jan Mahon — August 19, 2010 @ 7:56 pm

    This looks very good. I’ve never heard of purslane. Maybe you can offer the kids a trip to Disney and go to Greece by yourself.

  5. 5

    drwinnie — August 19, 2010 @ 8:15 pm

    I can’t really afford it myself either, plus I think my kids would love it…the Greek restaurant in my town in one of their favorites. Maybe when their a little older (and I win the lottery).

  6. 6

    Monet — August 19, 2010 @ 9:22 pm

    I have never heard of purslane…which is a shame considering it has such nutritional benefits. I also wish I could visit Greece…and maybe it will happen one day in the future…but as for now, I will also make wonderful Greek recipes like this to transport me to the isles!

  7. 7

    Liz from Simple Italian Cooking — August 19, 2010 @ 9:33 pm

    I’ve never heard of purslane either. Maybe I’ll have to go to Greece to find out what it tastes like… yeah right…

    The only way I like feta is with a salad, so perfect timing for such a warm weather salad!

  8. 8

    Miss Becky — August 20, 2010 @ 6:16 am

    this is why I love your blog. I learn something whenever I come here. Purslane? Who knew? I’ve been pulling it out of my flower beds for years. Thanks for the great info. It’s so much nicer learning this stuff from a blog with great photos, than a book.

  9. 9

    Suzanne Collier — August 20, 2010 @ 7:32 am

    I will have to look for purslane. I’ve been known to eat a weed or two in my life, one of my favorites being lambsquarter. My mom and I used to pick it out of the “bar-ditches” in the early spring when it was tender. I can still taste the mild greens and wish I had a big batch of it!

    Love the colorful salad with the heirlooms! Tomatoes are a staple at almost every meal we have. Thanks for a new way to serve them!

    And great story! I laughed out loud at your abrupt search for a plane ticket. LOL!

  10. 10

    Kalynskitchen — August 20, 2010 @ 9:06 am

    What a great-looking salad. (Plenty of purslane is growing at my house too!)

  11. 11

    City Share — August 20, 2010 @ 11:47 am

    I had never heard of purslane until I got some in my CSA share this Spring. I’m jealous that you have it cropping up on your property. It was delicious.

  12. 12

    MrsWheelbarrow — August 20, 2010 @ 5:12 pm

    I’m here at the beach with cukes and feta and gorgeous tomatoes… and just found purslane growing in the backyard. I see this salad making an appearance tomorrow! Thank you for the lovely inspiration, and some sweet photos, too. Are you using your new tripod? xoCathy

  13. 13

    tom — August 21, 2010 @ 9:10 am

    Read the same article, did the same thing with travel costs, made the salad and should have added purslane, great idea. I have it growing everywhere and try to add it to corn salads often. Oh, try the beets with the potato walnut spread. It might just be my new favorite way to eat beets.

  14. 14

    RavieNomNoms — August 23, 2010 @ 12:42 pm

    Looks fantastic!

  15. 15

    Tomato Ginger Jam | Healthy Green Kitchen — August 25, 2010 @ 8:20 am

    [...] were the salads: this one, this one and this [...]

  16. 16

    Project Food Blog Challenge #1...Ready, Set, Blog! | Healthy Green Kitchen — September 17, 2010 @ 9:14 pm

    [...] typical for a recipe blog, or even a healthy recipe blog. Reading my blog might inspire someone to put purslane it in their salad. Or maybe it will get them out in their yard to discover an edible plant like anise hyssop. It [...]

  17. 17

    rekha — June 27, 2011 @ 8:14 am

    this looks really delicious… I can almost taste the freshness of it .

  18. 18

    Frank Wang — February 8, 2013 @ 4:50 pm

    Great recipe, I love it!!!
    Frank NY US

    • Winnie replied: — February 10th, 2013 @ 9:39 pm

      Thanks Frank!

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